A visual comparison of their early development

eHangar.com Gallery
Now that Richard Taylor has just released his ninth and tenth limited edition prints, I thought it would be an interesting exercise to compare his progress after ten prints with that of his famous father after the same number. :idea:

   

   Where I can find the early RT1 images we will be able to examine and compare their progress at each stage (by print number) and I'm sure there will be some intriguing observations and comments made as we scrutinise their development. :wink:

   

   So here we go with print No.1 from their respective careers.

   

   

   

   1978 Phantom Launch by Robert Taylor.

   

   

   

   2006 Typhoon Scramble by Richard Taylor.

   

   RT1's first image is almost comic book in style and gives no indication of what was to follow.
10/11/2007 22:00:05
Print No.2

   

   

   

   1979 Last Phantom by Robert Taylor.

   

   

   

   2006 Coastal Patrol by Richard Taylor.

   

   I think many people will be surprised to learn that RT1's career opened with two paintings of the same jet fighter and it still surprises me that RT2 painted such an incredibly overdone subject as his second offering.
10/11/2007 22:12:12
Print No.3

   

   

   

   1979 Hurricane by Robert Taylor.

   

   

   

   2006 Dual Victory by Richard Taylor.
10/11/2007 22:27:18
Print No.4

   

   

   

   1979 Lancaster by Robert Taylor.

   

   

   

   2006 Days Of Thunder by Richard Taylor.
10/11/2007 22:35:36
Print No.5

   

   

   

   1979 Spitfire by Robert Taylor.

   

   

   

   2006 Rover Patrol by Richard Taylor.

   

   Any pattern emerging? I can already sense that RT1 was finding his feet after five and showing great potential for something very special that was soon to break forth in full measure. RT2 is still searching for the elusive 'wow' factor that is missing in his work at this stage IMO.

   

   More later. :)
10/11/2007 22:50:35
Now things start to get really interesting as RT1 moves to his first depiction of an actual event, and we see Richard's own style beginning to make itself felt although some people believed that it resembled his father's rather too closely.

   

   Print No.6

   

   

   

   1979 Swordfish Attack At Taranto by Robert Taylor.

   

   

   

   2007 The Royce Raid by Richard Taylor.
11/11/2007 00:57:56
Print No.7

   

   

   

   1980 Dambusters by Robert Taylor.

   

   

   

   2007 Ramraiders by Richard Taylor.

   

   So what have we here at print No.7? Probably the first masterpiece by RT1 with collector's antennae by now well tuned and sending out the drum beat that was to kickstart the golden age of aviation art. Richard has produced here what is most likely his best work to date.
11/11/2007 01:18:58
Print No.8

   

   

   

   1980 Canadian Wing by Robert Taylor.

   

   

   

   2007 Red Tail Escort by Richard Taylor.
11/11/2007 01:45:50
Print No.9

   

   

   

   1980 Climbing Out by Robert Taylor.

   

   

   

   2007 Threatening Skies by Richard Taylor.
11/11/2007 01:50:38
Print No.10

   

   

   

   1980 Memphis Belle by Robert Taylor.

   

   

   

   2007 Into The Sun by Richard Taylor.

   

   How do they stack up guys? One thing is very clear to me... that RT2 is getting stronger with each new work but whether he will ever reach the dizzy heights attained by his father during a long and distinguished career is yet to be seen. I like Richard's last three or four pieces much better than his earlier efforts but I suspect that RT1 is eventually going to be seen as having been in a class of his own... the roots of which can be clearly detected in his early paintings that are showcased here.

   

   I will continue to compare the work of father and son as Richard's output increases. :)
11/11/2007 02:12:38
With the exception of a couple of the RT1 works, one thing that I've noticed is that both of them have started by doing relatively "simple" paintings. That is, there is an aircraft or group of aircraft in the foreground, but there is not much going on in the background in terms of other aircraft or anything else of real interest. Just interesting since there was a comment about Richard not having as much detail in his works, but to me it looks like Robert didn't have as much detail in some of his earlier works as well.

   

   I think this is a great post because we can compare apples to apples. I look forward to Richard's future works, but like Stormchaser said, Robert will likely be in a class of his own. I don't think it's because Richard's work will not be as good, I think it's more because the market is different now and I believe it's harder to have a "superstar" artist when the aviation art field is starting to grow with so many talented people.

   

   Ken
11/11/2007 03:09:45
Great post!

   

   Only recently I was wondering which of Robert's pictures were released in what order.

   

   Interesting stuff!
11/11/2007 10:58:20
Although the comparisons between father and son have been going on since Richard's first print was released, it is very interesting to have their first ten images compared in an "apples to apples" format.

   

   One thing I noticed is that Robert seems to have already developed his signature landscape/cloudscapes early on, while a couple of his aircraft perspectives seem somewhat off, notably in "Memphis Belle". His son, meanwhile seems to have developed oppositely, aircraft perspectives being good (except in "The Royce Raid"), and landscape/cloudscapes being less than inspiring (except in "Rover Patrol").

   

   I'd have to say that their best effort in this early era would be Robert's "Climbing Out" (with an honorable mention going to "Phantom Launch") and Richard's "Days of Thunder".

   

   As an aside to my comment about Robert Taylor's cloudscapes, I always chuckle when we have one of our beautiful Colorado sunrise/sunsets, and my wife makes a remark about it being a "Robert Taylor sky". :lol:
11/11/2007 12:16:23
Interesting post Stormchaser, makes for interesting comparison. I can't remember what was Roberts 11th? to compare with Vital Force of Richards.

   

   Of course you need to add these are their first Aviation art print releases. Both father and son have had print releases of their paintings before the above.

   

   What would be fantstic to compare (for art lovers) but maybe not for Aviation art lovers!! would be the four commissions Robert did when he first met Pat Barnard, a Tiger etc I believe, with the wildlife prints Richard did prior to joining the MG/AH when he was with SWAfineart and Sean White.

   

   What makes your comparison, Stormchaser, also interesting is the thought when Robert did these what he really wanted to be painting was maritime art, and when Richard did these his heart was in Wildlife art. Both of them at the above stages of their careers are learning aircraft!
12/11/2007 16:34:12
I guess I should express my preferences FWIW!!

   

   Roberts "Climbing Out" shows all the classic traits I've come to expect emerging, the landscape, the frontal banked quarter image of the Lanc in this case, just the big sky clouds missing. Those are hinted at in Lancaster, Hurricane and Spitfire.

   

   And For Richard, it came in for quite a bit of stick here on ehangar, but I love "Rover Patrol" (closely of course followed by "Typhoon Scramble :wink: ) the power of the Mk VI rocket carrying mossie set against the stark Norwegian landscape shows great things to come.
12/11/2007 17:01:52
Interesting post Stormchaser, makes for interesting comparison. I can't remember what was Robert's 11th? to compare with Vital Force of Richards.

   Coming soon! Once we get an official image for Vital Force.

   

   
Of course you need to add that these are their first Aviation art print releases. Both father and son have had print releases of their paintings before the above.

   Quite correct... they both had wildlife prints issued before entering the Avart field.

   

   
What makes your comparison, Stormchaser, also interesting is the thought when Robert did these what he really wanted to be painting was maritime art, and when Richard did these his heart was in Wildlife art. Both of them at the above stages of their careers are learning aircraft!

   Good observation and I think it definitely shows in these earliest pieces.
12/11/2007 20:45:48
I can't remember what was Robert's 11th? to compare with Vital Force of Richard's.

   Robert's eleventh was Dawn Scramble which I will post now and for comparison purposes will await the official image of Richard's Vital Force which I will post when it is released. Coincidentally, they do seem to share certain similarities.

   

   Print No.11

   

   

   

   1981 Dawn Scramble by Robert Taylor.

   

   Got the official image now of Richard's eleventh.

   

   

   

   2007 Vital Force by Richard Taylor.
13/11/2007 08:17:39
Excellent thread, Stormchaser! :twothumbsup

   

   It is very interesting to compare the early aviation art works by father and son. I would say that Richard came in with a bit of leg up because of his dad's advice and help, no doubt, but there's also no denying that he's very talented already in his own right.

   

   I always thought RT's first Memphis Belle print was quite bad - the B-17's never looked quite right to me.

   

   Thanks for starting this thread and taking all the trouble to dig up the early pix from the MG site, Nick, and I look forward to your update and more input from others. :)
14/11/2007 20:14:08
this is very interesting, wouldnt mind seeing how richard does Big bombers as a main theme ie, stirling etc and also figure work
16/11/2007 10:28:49


   

   I always thought RT's first Memphis Belle print was quite bad - the B-17's never looked quite right to me.

   

   

   

   yeah i always though that glad its not just me
16/11/2007 10:30:23