Grumman F4F Wildcat - USS Lexington - rediscovered on 04 March 2018

March 6, 2018
by eHangar
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Lady Lex Found After 76 Years!

USS Lexington (CV-2) circa 1931The USS Lexington aircraft carrier, which was sunk in 1942 at the Battle of the Coral Sea, has been found after 76 years!

The underwater search team was led by Microsoft co-founder Paul G Allen. Its research vessel, the R/V Petrel, found the wreckage on Sunday (04 Mar 2018) about 3,000m (two miles) below the surface and more than 500 miles (800km) off the eastern coast of Australia.

What’s amazing is that everything looks perfectly preserved. Initial images of the wreck and two of its aircraft – an Grumman F4F Wildcat and Douglas TBD Devastator – shows intact and vibrantly-coloured markings, almost as if they were sunk yesterday!

I’m excited to see if they will bring up (as they no doubt will) some of these rare aircraft and perhaps restore them to flying condition again. Imagine, a flying Devastator in original paintwork!

Douglas TBD Devastator - USS Lexington - rediscovered on 04 March 2018

Grumman F4F Wildcat - USS Lexington - rediscovered on 04 March 2018

Grumman F4F Wildcat - USS Lexington - rediscovered on 04 March 2018Aircraft wreck photos copyright Paul G Allen

Aircraft wreck

September 6, 2017
by eHangar
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Wreckology – Pre-eHangar Site!

Aircraft wreck MalaysiaBefore eHangar.com was born in 2003, I had created a few other aviation-related sites. Mind you, these were literally hand-coded, typing in raw HTML codes into a text editor, and thus were very basic in appearance and functionality. These old sites are long gone from the Internet, but one day I thought of a subsite I built before and dug into my old backups, and lo and behold, I found the original HTML files!

This subsite from my old flight2000.com site came about when a newspaper reported the finding of a wreck in a Malaysian forest. Aviation forums and netizens attempted to identify the wreck from the photos posted, and this subsite was my contribution to the effort. My armchair sleuthing helped to identify the wreck, which is why I have always been proud of this subsite which chronicled my efforts. Continue Reading →