Grumman F4F Wildcat - USS Lexington - rediscovered on 04 March 2018

March 6, 2018
by eHangar
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Lady Lex Found After 76 Years!

USS Lexington (CV-2) circa 1931The USS Lexington aircraft carrier, which was sunk in 1942 at the Battle of the Coral Sea, has been found after 76 years!

The underwater search team was led by Microsoft co-founder Paul G Allen. Its research vessel, the R/V Petrel, found the wreckage on Sunday (04 Mar 2018) about 3,000m (two miles) below the surface and more than 500 miles (800km) off the eastern coast of Australia.

What’s amazing is that everything looks perfectly preserved. Initial images of the wreck and two of its aircraft – an Grumman F4F Wildcat and Douglas TBD Devastator – shows intact and vibrantly-coloured markings, almost as if they were sunk yesterday!

I’m excited to see if they will bring up (as they no doubt will) some of these rare aircraft and perhaps restore them to flying condition again. Imagine, a flying Devastator in original paintwork!

Douglas TBD Devastator - USS Lexington - rediscovered on 04 March 2018

Grumman F4F Wildcat - USS Lexington - rediscovered on 04 March 2018

Grumman F4F Wildcat - USS Lexington - rediscovered on 04 March 2018Aircraft wreck photos copyright Paul G Allen

May 23, 2014
by dogsbody
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TBD Devastator Units of the US Navy (Osprey Combat Aircraft 20)

Osprey’s title examining the TBD Devastator Units’ short-lived participation in World War II (1939-1945). The first monoplane aircraft ordered by the US Navy for carrier operations, the Douglas TBD Devastator was designed to fulfil a requirement for a new torpedo bomber. Just 129 were built, and when it entered service it was the most modern aircraft of its type anywhere in the world. Its only real taste of action came on 4 June 1942 in the pivotal Battle of Midway, when 35 were shot down in a clash with Japanese A6M Zero fighters. The aircraft was replaced by the Grumman Avenger weeks later.