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Topic Rating: +1 Topic Rating: +1 (1 votes) 
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Guss' collection of originals
viking
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February 9, 2012 - 7:55 am
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The aircraft in the Shaw painting is a Beech SNB which is a Navy version of the Beech 18. This was used as a navigation trainer (there are several variants of the Beech 18 used by the armed forces) but VT-5 was a training squadron.

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Guss
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February 9, 2012 - 10:27 am
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Thanks viking, much appreciated!

fuzzy
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February 9, 2012 - 11:47 am
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Guss,

Sonny’s reply is what I figured – the model company played with it to make it fit their exact needs.

The only other explanation would have been something like the current Lucien Cave mystery. Several similar paintings.

fuzzy

fuzzy
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February 9, 2012 - 8:09 pm
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Speaking of Lucien Cave, I pulled out my painting and gave it a close look. It’s definitely a painting. Those highlights on the prop are pretty good sized blobs of paint! You can see the paint thickness in several other areas as well.

Looking at the brushstrokes and trying to imagine how Cave painted, it looks to me like he was fast. I can see some long, bold brushstrokes on the painting. When you look at it closely, he has an ability to show a lot with a minimum of brushstrokes. My guess is that he could knock one of his paintings out pretty quickly.

Just a guess on my part, but he might have taken several cracks at any given subject until he arrived at what he was looking for.

fuzzy

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Guss
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February 26, 2012 - 4:37 pm
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Here’s a few interesting pieces that I added to my collection over the past few months:

First, a painting of a twin boom fighter by Ted Grohs, an artist from California who was actrive in the 30s and 40’s. Mr. Grohs did a series of airplane illustrations for the Fuller Paint Company, and he also illustrated a book published in 1958 titled “An Airplane in Every Garage”. The plane appears similar to a Fokker G.1, but I’m not certain if it ever was ever produced. Can anyone identify it? The painting itself has almost a pastel feel to it.

This is a painting of a Sikorsky CH-53 Sea Stallion by Andrew Whyte, who was employed by Sikorsky for 41 years as a helicopter designer and resident artist. During his time with Sikorsky he produced almost 400 paintings which were intended to familiarize potential customers with the product. He also did 60 paintings for five company calendars, and two 8 x 16 foot murals, one of which was displayed above the exhibition floor at the 1993 Paris Air Show. This is a larger painting, measuring 20 x 30 inches.

Finally, I was very fortunate to be able to add a painting by Harley Copic to my collection – a McDonald Douglas F4 Phantom. Fuzzy has set up a Harley Copic thread in the eHangar.com Gallery section, and his artwork just blows me away. This painting also appears in fuzzy’s thread in its original condition when I purchased it. The matting was in terrible shape, but the painting itself only required a little professional cleaning, and it was well worth the investment. I’m proud to own an original painting by this remarkable aviation artist.

fuzzy
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February 26, 2012 - 5:30 pm
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Guss,

Nice additions!

The Ted Groh looks a bit like a version of a P-38. Maybe someone’s idea for a small bomber version of a P-38? Interesting. The CH-53 is cool as well.

The Copic F-4 sure cleaned up nice. Shows what a good cleaning can do for a painting! I could see how its condition as listed on eBay might have scared off potential buyers. I’m glad you took the plunge and had it properly restored. What a great F-4 painting – and you should be proud for bringing it back to life! ๐Ÿ˜€

fuzzy

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Guss
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March 5, 2012 - 2:09 am
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I was recently able to add another Harley Copic original to my collection, and in doing so I had the privelege of meeting the artist in person. I now understand why fuzzy has devoted an entire thread to Mr. Copic’s artwork – it’s incredible. This is a Vought F4U Corsair with full flaps down, and the photographs simply don’t do the painting justice.

fuzzy
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March 5, 2012 - 3:15 am
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Gus,

Nice to see another Copic fan out there! I’ve talked to quite a few over the years, and the club seems to be growing.

Very cool little painting you picked up!

Harley has generally done larger paintings over the years. He’s got such a backlog of interesting subjects he wants to tackle that he’s recently started doing some smaller works and really enjoys it. I’m looking forward to the new ones.

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Guss
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March 26, 2012 - 1:30 am
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Here’s a few more pieces that I’ve added to my collection of originals – a variety of artists and subjects.

An Israeli Air Force F-15 Eagle downing a Mig-23 Flogger painted by Jim Bryant in 1982. This painting measures 23″ x 23″.

This is a concept art piece that was painted by Jo Kotula. He painted hundreds of covers for Model Airplane News, along with what is considered some of the most classic box art for Aurora Models. Mr. Kotula, who passed away in 1998, was also one of the founding members of the American Association of Aviation Artists.

Finally, this is a painting by Mark Postlethwaite that he did for the Osprey book “303rd Bombardment Group”, published in 2003. I confirmed with Mark that he had the painting framed with signatures of 13 members of the 303rd BG, and he did he writing on the mount as well.

As always, thanks for looking!

fuzzy
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March 26, 2012 - 1:55 am
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Gus,

3 excellent paintings!

Love the subject of the Kotula painting. That is one wild concept! Too bad they didn’t build that one. If it had worked, it would have been a blast to fly, but I’ll bet the pucker factor would have been off the chart!

Kurt

Alexandre Jay
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July 6, 2012 - 9:05 am
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Wow! This is some collection! l love the Fairey Firefly over London (my home town as it happens)…….

fuzzy
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July 6, 2012 - 11:19 am
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I have finally identified the aircraft in this Lucien Cave painting:

There were a few good guesses, but they didn’t quite hit the mark. It is the:

Vultee YA-19

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V…..ltee_YA-19

The Vultee V-11 and V-12 were American attack aircraft of the 1930s. Developments of the Vultee V-1 single-engined airliner, the V-11 and V-12 were purchased by several nation’s armed forces, including China, who used them in combat against Japanese forces in the Second Sino-Japanese War. The United States Army Air Corps purchased small numbers of the V-11 as the Vultee YA-19 in the years before World War II, testing them to gather data to compare against twin engine light attack planes.

In the late 1930s, the United States Army Air Corps favored twin engine light attack aircraft but seven YA-19 aircraft were ordered in the summer of 1938 for comparison purposes. YA-19s were armed with six .30 in (7.62 mm) machine guns and 1,080 lb (490 kg) bombs in internal bomb bay, powered by a 1,200 hp (895 kW) Twin Wasp radial engine and was manned by a crew of three – pilot, observer/gunner, and bombardier/photographer.

An interesting feature of the YA-19 design was its horizontal stabiliser located entirely forwards of the vertical tail. The vertical stabilizer caused directional instability (yaw axis) due to undersize. The last YA-19 (S/N 38-555) was equipped with enlarged vertical stabilizer for improvement of directional stability but performance was not significantly improved.

Service test proved that twin engine attack aircraft had higher speed and carried more armament and larger bomb load. As a result no further YA-19s were ordered. After comparison tests five YA-19s were redesignated A-19 and assigned to the 17th Attack Group at March Field in California for a brief period. Later were transferred to the Panama Canal Zone for utility transport and liaison duties. The USAAC A-19 was never used in combat and was quickly replaced by more capable attack aircraft in the early 1940s.

It’s a distinctive aircraft. The small protrusion ahead of the canopy (some kind of sight?), the thick band of metal at the base of the front of the canopy, the small window in the rear fuselage, the large radio direction finder loop, the horizontal stabilizer placed ahead of the vertical stabilizer, and the enclosed tail wheel all give it away!

Now we know. An obscure bit of aviation trivia for you!

Smeagol
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July 6, 2012 - 11:27 am
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That is some collection

I love the SE5a & the Brisfit on the second set of pages
Two pieces by South African artist Darryl Legg, an SE-5a and a Bristol F2B Fighter
.
.

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Guss
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July 6, 2012 - 11:51 am
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Thanks very much Alexandre. The Firefly is one of the first pieces I purchased (directly from Mark Postlethwaite) and it’s one of my favorites. London is in for lots of excitement with the Summer Olympics – should be quite a show!

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Guss
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July 6, 2012 - 12:00 pm
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Well done fuzzy! That was some great detective work. Now if you can only figure out the subject is of the Ted Grohs painting…..

I recently acquired a couple more Lucien Cave paintings that I’ll post in the next day or two, along with just a bit of biographical information about the artist. It might be time to set up a Lucien Cave thread to group his paintings in one place on eHangar.

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Guss
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July 6, 2012 - 12:31 pm
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Thanks Gollum! Darryl recently sent me a couple of photos of some of his newer paintings, and they’re excellent. There is also an interesting youtube clip of him creating some artwork at an r/c model airplane event:

Smeagol
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July 6, 2012 - 1:25 pm
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THX

Makes a change to watch someone else paint ๐Ÿ™‚

fuzzy
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July 6, 2012 - 4:04 pm
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Guss,

My hunch on the Ted Grohs airplane is that it is totally a concept. I doubt that a mock-up or prototype was even built.

I say that because the details of a real airplane are missing. Check out the engine installation in particular. I don’t see an inlet for air to the engine. I don’t see an exhaust either. No inlets and outlets for things like radiators, oil coolers, intercoolers…

Based on the general configuration, and the wing shape in particular, I’ll bet this was someone’s idea to take a P-38 and turn it into an attack aircraft or light bomber. Given the lack of required hardware in the painting, it was probably an idea that never went anywhere.

I’d start seaching for Lockheed concepts of the late 30’s and early 40’s if you want to try and find it. I’ve never seen anything like it before. It might have made for a successful aircraft – perhaps something along the lines of a Mosquito.

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Guss
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July 6, 2012 - 4:37 pm
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I suspect you’re right fuzzy – the closest design I could find to this aircraft is the Fokker G.1 (and it is pretty close):


[/img]

cwilliamrose
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August 9, 2012 - 12:47 am
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fuzzy said
I have finally identified the aircraft in this Lucien Cave painting:

………..Now we know. An obscure bit of aviation trivia for you!

ย 

Nice work, thanks for the proper ID!

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