Aviation Art - Release Your Brakes and Hunt for Heaven by William S. Phillips

April 18, 2015
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Release Your Brakes and Hunt for Heaven by William S. Phillips

Aviation Art - Release Your Brakes and Hunt for Heaven by William S. Phillips“They came from our secret base at Shangri-la,” President Roosevelt claimed of Doolittle’s “land-based” B-25 bombers that attacked Japan on April 18, 1942. It is common knowledge today that they flew from the deck of the carrier USS Hornet. However, back then, the idea of a fully laden, twin-engine bomber taking off in less than 500 feet was just as much a surprise to the Japanese as it was just to the US airmen whose job it would be to fly the mission.

Beginning 1 March 1942, in preparation for the famous Doolittle Raid on Tokyo, twenty-four crews were selected to pick up modified B-25 bombers in Minneapolis and fly them to Eglin Field, Florida. There the crews received intensive training for three weeks in simulated carrier deck takeoffs, low-level and night flying, low-altitude bombing and over-water navigation, primarily out of Wagner Field, Auxiliary Field 1.

Here William Phillips’ Release Your Brakes and Hunt for Heaven depicts Lieutenant Henry Miller, USN, from nearby Naval Air Station Pensacola supervising the training which would prepare the crews for their carrier take-offs. Airmen were instructed to “drop the landing flaps, pour on the coal and pull-up on the yoke.” None of the assembled volunteers would have ever guessed that in just under two months, sixteen B-25’s, loaded to 31,000 lbs – a ton greater than its designed maximum load – would claw their way into the air in less than 300 feet from a carrier off the hostile shores of Japan.

Aviation Art - Into the Storm by Roy Grinnell

February 25, 2015
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Into the Storm by Roy Grinnell

Classic Grumman A-6 Intruder painting by Roy Grinnell.

Available as a lithographic and giclee print, the original painting is displayed at the US Naval Museum in Pensacola.

Aircraft info from Wikipedia:
The Grumman A-6 Intruder was an American, twin jet-engine, mid-wing all-weather attack aircraft built by Grumman Aerospace. In service with the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps between 1963 and 1997, the Intruder was designed as an all-weather medium attack aircraft to replace the piston-engined Douglas A-1 Skyraider. As the A-6E was slated for retirement, its precision strike mission was taken over by the Grumman F-14 Tomcat equipped with a LANTIRN pod. From the A-6, a specialized electronic warfare derivative, the EA-6 was developed.

Aviation Art - The Fleet's In by John Young

January 13, 2015
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The Fleet’s In by John Young

Aviation Art - The Fleet's In by John YoungL/E of 650
S/N by the Artist
Image Size: 20″ x 16″
Paper Size: 25.75″ x 22″

Plane Type: Boeing F4B-2

Cruising high above the city and harbor Navy fighters signal the arrival of one of the most important ships of the day, an aircraft carrier. In the late 1920s aviation began to bloom within the U.S. Navy and the aircraft carrier gained recognition as the warship of the future. The diminutive Boeing fighter, the F4B-2, was one of the most successful designs of the period. With an operational appeal to the Army as well, the Boeing design evolved into the well known P-12 series. Carrier aviation has changed as dramatically as the Manhattan skyline but Naval Aviation has a foundation as solid as the city below.

October 14, 2014
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The Age of Orion: The Lockheed P-3 Story (Schiffer Military/Aviation History)

The Age of Orion is the first book devoted solely to the development and operational use of the illustrious USN maritime patrol and anti-submarine hunting aircraft the Lockheed P-3 Orion. David Reade details for the first time the complete history and wal

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  • Used Book in Good Condition