May 30, 2015
by eHangar
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Mavis vs B-17

B17 vs Mavis

I just came across this interesting story of a Mavis Japanese flying boat dogfighting with a B-17 Flying Fortress.

The incident happened over the Solomon Islands on November 21, 1942. Two B-17s spotted the lone Mavis 150 miles south of Guadalcanal.

The aviation art depicting the action is from a cover of a book written by Lt. Cdr Hitsuji. The artist is Yoshiyuki Takani.

The bow gunner peering behind P. O. Kenzo Takahashi. He is indicating to the pilots of the Mavis to manoevre into a better position for the tail gunner to fire his 20mm gun at the chasing Flying Fort.

The Mavis was holed by 50 bullets, and two crewmen were seriously wounded but she returned home to her base safely.

Source of story: Mr Minoru Kamada

Postscript:

Kenzo Takahashi with Ron Werneth 2002

Photo source: Ron Werneth @ Facebook.com

Kenzo Takahashi was a navigator on both the Imperial Japanese Navy’s Kawanishi H8K1 Emily and Mavis flying boats. He survived heavy combat sorties including Dutch Harbor and the Solomons.

September 2, 2014
by admin
2 Comments

B-17 Flying Fortress Units of the Eighth Air Force (1) (Osprey Combat Aircraft 18)

The Boeing B-17 has come to epitomise the American war effort in Europe during World War II (1939-1945), the huge four-engined heavy day bomber taking the fight to Germany from the late summer of 1942 through to VE-Day. The primary operator of the Flying Fortress in Western Europe was the ‘Mighty Eighth’. This volume, which is the first of two dealing exclusively with the ‘Mighty Eighth’, covers the 15 Bomb Groups of the First Air Division, each of which controlled four squadrons. The evolution of the force is traced through first-hand accounts of those individuals that took part in the action.

June 1, 2014
by admin
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B-17 Flying Fortress Units of the Pacific War (Combat Aircraft)

The B-17 saw combat in the Pacific from the moment a formation of these bombers arrived at Pearl Harbor during the midst of the 7 December 1941 Japanese attack. By the end of World War II (1939-1945), SB-17 rescue craft were saving combat crews in the waters off Japan. This book reveals why, to the public, the Flying Fortress was better known than the Spitfire, the Boeing 747, or Lindbergh’s Spirit of St Louis. The name recognition enjoyed by the B-17 was that company’s reason for creating B-17 Steak Sauce and Osprey’s reason to round out the saga of this great wartime aircraft.

Product Features

  • Used Book in Good Condition