October 25, 2016
by eHangar
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Soviet Steel Train Lost by Marii Chernev

eHangar.com Aviation Art Soviet Steel Train Lost by Marii Chernev

The German Henschel Hs-129 is not often depicted in aviation art. Marii Chernev’s painting, titled “Soviet Steel Train Lost”, is a welcome addition to the very small stable of aviation art featuring this ungainly aircraft.

The German Henschel Hs-129 was a single-seater twin-engine attack aircraft built for combat against tanks and armored trains.

Despite the plane’s shortcomings, the Luftwaffe desperately needed aircraft for the assault of 1940, and in the winter of 1940, Henschel received an order for a series of Hs-129 planes. With the occupation of France, a large number of Gnome-Rhone 14M engines were confiscated, each running at 700 hp. Experiments with installing more powerful (albeit unreliable) engines led to the creation of the Hs-129B, which had superior specs to the original Hs-129 and could return all the way to base if forced to fly with only one engine.

Thai Air Force Aviation Art - Bearcat

June 8, 2015
by eHangar
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Thai Air Force Aviation Art

Thai Air Force Aviation Art - Bearcat

I visited the Royal Thai Air Force Museum in Bangkok in November 2012 and just recently looked again at these photos I took of the aviation art displayed there.

I believe aviation art enthusiasts will be interested to view these.

The quality of the art work is quite good and I wonder if these artist or artists are local Thai or a “farang” (foreigner) was commissioned to paint them.

At any rate, please enjoy them 🙂

(If you are reading this in the Blog section, click on “Join the forum discussion on this post” to view all the other photos posted.)

May 30, 2015
by eHangar
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Mavis vs B-17

B17 vs Mavis

I just came across this interesting story of a Mavis Japanese flying boat dogfighting with a B-17 Flying Fortress.

The incident happened over the Solomon Islands on November 21, 1942. Two B-17s spotted the lone Mavis 150 miles south of Guadalcanal.

The aviation art depicting the action is from a cover of a book written by Lt. Cdr Hitsuji. The artist is Yoshiyuki Takani.

The bow gunner peering behind P. O. Kenzo Takahashi. He is indicating to the pilots of the Mavis to manoevre into a better position for the tail gunner to fire his 20mm gun at the chasing Flying Fort.

The Mavis was holed by 50 bullets, and two crewmen were seriously wounded but she returned home to her base safely.

Source of story: Mr Minoru Kamada

Postscript:

Kenzo Takahashi with Ron Werneth 2002

Photo source: Ron Werneth @ Facebook.com

Kenzo Takahashi was a navigator on both the Imperial Japanese Navy’s Kawanishi H8K1 Emily and Mavis flying boats. He survived heavy combat sorties including Dutch Harbor and the Solomons.